Rogue Traders

*Please be wary of rogue traders cold calling, please do not agree to work offered by unsolicited doorstep callers, the risks are high.
*If you want work doing in your home or garden, take time to get three quotes from reputable businesses you trust and make your decision on who to use in your own time.
*If you are concerned someone is at risk, always call the police.
*If you are concerned rogue traders are operating in your area, always report it.
*If someone knocks on your door and you are not sure, don’t open the door.
*If you see cold callers in the area, have concerns for neighbours, or have any information please phone 101 or email 101@dc.police.uk.
*Please phone 999 if immediate/or a crime is taking place.
*Please pass this information on to neighbours.

Message from Cornwall Wildlife Trust

At the beginning of the Coronavirus lockdown we realised we needed to be there for wildlife, wildlife lovers and those isolating at home. Without the ability to venture too far, we acted fast to provide things to see, do, read, watch and make from home that would maintain a connection with nature.

Please follow this link:  www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/coronavirus

If you wish to let us know what you have been up to, we would love to hear from you by email or on any of our social media channels.

We also wanted you to know that we have put our Spring edition of Wild Cornwall (normally a members exclusive magazine), online for all to enjoy. Packed with all the wildlife happenings around Cornwall.

www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/spring2020

Sarah Raynor

(Head of People and Engagement). Cornwall Wildlife Trust

The Village Project

AN ARTS AND COMMUNITY PROJECT

A CREATIVE ARCHIVE FROM THE HOME

During Spring 2020 people in Cornwall are invited to join in the VILLAGE project, to help us create a special new artwork to form a record of the extraordinary and challenging situation we are all in because of the Coronavirus pandemic.

We’d like your help in creating what will become an online gallery, there’s a questionnaire we’d love your answers to and there are creative activities you can take part in. To find these just follow the link and click on the yellow TAKE PART door.

By taking part your contributions will offer an important perspective on these extraordinary times – and will be inspiring the creation of new dance, new songs and a gallery of new visual art.

https://www.villageproject.co.uk/

Paper copies will be soon be available from St Day Post Office, should you know someone who does not have access to the internet, but may wish to take part.

This post is on behalf of ‘The VILLAGE Project

British Red Cross continues to tackle loneliness in Camborne, Pool and Redruth

The British Red Cross has run its Community Connector service in Cornwall since 2017 which aims to provide vital support to lonely and isolated local people, In Camborne, Pool and Redruth, over the age of 55years.

The service, which is being delivered through the Red Cross’ partnership with the Sports England, will offer direct, personalised support for people experiencing loneliness or social isolation. Helping them to access their community and improve on their daily physical activity. This delivery has been adapted during the COVID 19 lock down and is telephone support only at present.

Redruth and Camborne were identified as areas where a particularly high number of people need additional support. Sports England have identified that over half of 55year olds and older do no physical activity at all; by encouraging more physical activity and supporting the individual with their own person centred plan to feel less lonely, we can hopefully reduce their feelings of loneliness.

What can the Red Cross do to help?
They can offer:
> Initial period of up to 3 months support
> Aim to help each person feel better connected and more involved in their local area
> Co-develop tailored plan of activities to enable each person to achieve things they want
> Typically, they could explore interests, support to take part in them with like-minded people in local area, and build confidence and independence so person feels able to stay involved
> Help to motivate them to improve on their daily Physical activity.

The Red Cross Understands that during the Coronavirus pandemic, people have been offering tremendous support to the community of Cornwall, especially through Help lines. But are there people you can identify who are calling on these help lines who could be supported by the Red Cross Connecting Communities Service, who are within the project area?
If so they would love to support them and with your help of identifying them they can.

For more information about this project or to make a referral to the Community Connector service, please call:
Charlet Treloar: 07912 080912
Heather Lawry: 07843 343623

Or email us at: Ctreloar@redcross.org.uk Heatherlawry@redcross.org.uk

*Referral form available in Documents – “Red Cross Referral Form”

Cornwall Council Press Release

Household Waste and Recycling Centres reopen on Tuesday 19 May

We (Cornwall Council) are finalising plans to reopen many of Cornwall’s Household Waste and Recycling Centres on Tuesday, 19 May but for safety reasons we will need to restrict how and when residents access the sites and the types of waste they can bring.

Rob Nolan, Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protections, said: “Unfortunately, reopening the HWRCs is not as simple as just unlocking the gates and it has to be done in such a way that protects the safety and wellbeing of staff and the public. Each site is different and presents its own particular set of challenges. Therefore, we are introducing restrictions to ensure we can operate them safely.”

We have been putting together bespoke plans, including traffic management and social distancing systems, to protect the safety of site users and staff.

If we are not satisfied that a site is operating safely, or if traffic congestion is creating issues on the public roads, then facilities may be closed at short notice.

We are opening HWRCs for essential use only. This means using an HWRC only for general rubbish (black bag waste or bulky items) and garden waste that cannot be stored safely at home without risk of injury or harm to health.

Rob Nolan added: “Kerbside rubbish, recycling, garden and bulky waste collection services are all running as normal, so please check first to see if you can dispose of your waste by one of these services before going to an HWRC.”

As seen at other HWRCs across the country, we anticipate very long queues on reopening. To help alleviate some pressure we will be operating traffic management systems and restricting when you can visit an HWRC with a vehicle number plate system:

If the last digit of your number plate is ODD – 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 – then you may only visit an HWRC on an ODD date of the month, e.g. 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, or 29 May etc.

For example, if your license plate number is WL57 ABO, then the last digit is 7 – an odd number – so you may only visit an HWRC on an odd date of the month, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29 May etc.

If the last digit of your vehicle number plate is an EVEN number –  0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 – then you may only visit an HWRC on an EVEN date of the month, e.g. 20, 22, 24, 26 May etc.

For example, if your number plate is B398 EWP, the last digit is 8 – an even number – so you can only visit on an even date of the month. Even numbers include the number 0 (zero).

We will publish full details on the Council’s website later this week.

Please read all of the guidance on the website about visiting HWRCs during coronavirus restrictions before you set off or you may be turned away.

Coronavirus outbreak FAQs: what you can and can’t do (Updated 11 May 2020)

The government has set out its plan to return life to as near normal as we can, for as many people as we can, as quickly and fairly as possible in order to safeguard livelihoods, but in a way that is safe and continues to protect our NHS.

The government has published staying safe outside your home for guidance on what the new rules will mean. This page sets out key FAQ to inform the public and help you prepare for these changes.

This guidance applies in England – people in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK.

1. Public spaces / outdoor activities / exercise

1.1 What can I do that I couldn’t do before?

There are a limited number of things you can now do that you could not do before:

  • spend time outdoors – for example sitting and enjoying the fresh air, picnicking, or sunbathing
  • meet one other person from a different household outdoors – following social distancing guidelines
  • exercise outdoors as often as you wish – following social distancing guidelines
  • use outdoor sports courts or facilities, such as a tennis or basketball court, or golf course – with members of your household, or one other person while staying 2 metres apart
  • go to a garden centre

At all times, you should continue to observe social distancing guidelines when you are outside your home, including ensuring you are 2 metres away from anyone outside your household. As with before, you cannot:

  • visit friends and family in their homes
  • exercise in an indoor sports court, gym or leisure centre, or go swimming in a public pool
  • use an outdoor gym or playground
  • visit a private or ticketed attraction
  • gather in a group of more than two (excluding members of your own household), except for a few specific exceptions set out in law (for work, funerals, house moves, supporting the vulnerable, in emergencies and to fulfil legal obligations)

If you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating, you should stay at home – this is critical to staying safe and saving lives.

1.2 I don’t have to stay at home anymore?

You should stay at home as much as possible. The reasons you may leave home include:

  • for work, where you cannot work from home
  • going to shops that are permitted to be open – to get things like food and medicine
  • to exercise or spend time outdoors
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid injury or illness, escape risk of harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person

These reasons are exceptions and a fuller list is set out in the regulations. Even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent away from the home and ensuring that you are two metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

1.3 Are you reopening tennis courts / golf courses / basketball courts etc

Yes. Sports courts can re-open, but you should only partake in such activities alone, with members of your household, or with one other person from outside your household, while practising social distancing. You should take particular care if you need to use any indoor facilities next to these outdoor courts, such as toilets.

You should not use these facilities if you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating.

1.4 Can I meet my friends and family in the park?

You can meet one other person from outside your household if you are outdoors. Public gatherings of more than 2 people from different households are prohibited in law. There are no limits on gatherings in the park with members of your household.

1.5 On what date can I expand my household group?

The government has asked the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) to advise on the concept of “bubbles”, which would mean allowing people to expand their household group to include one other household. For the time being, you cannot visit friends or family, except to spend time outdoors with up to one person from a different household.

1.6 Can I go out to help a vulnerable person?

You can go out to care for or help a vulnerable person, or to provide other voluntary or charitable services, following the advice set out here. You should not do so if you have coronavirus symptoms, however mild.

Wherever possible, you should stay at least two metres away from others, and wash your hands for at least 20 seconds (or use hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available).

1.7 Are there restrictions on how far I can travel for my exercise or outdoor activity?

No. You can travel to outdoor open space irrespective of distance. You shouldn’t travel with someone from outside your household unless you can practise social distancing – for example by cycling. Leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home is not allowed.

1.8 Can I share a private vehicle with someone from another household?

No. You can only travel in a private vehicle alone, or with members of your household.

1.9 Are day trips and holidays ok? Can people stay in second homes?

Day trips to outdoor open space, in a private vehicle, are permitted. You should practise social distancing from other people outside your household.

Leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home for a holiday or other purpose is not allowed. This includes visiting second homes.

Premises such as hotels and bed and breakfasts will remain closed, except where providing accommodation for specific reasons set out in law, such as for critical workers where required for a reason relating to their work.

1.10 Can students return to their family home if they’ve been in halls all this time?

In general, leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home is not allowed.

If a student is moving permanently to live back at their family home, this is permitted.

1.11 Is there a limit on the number of people attending funerals?

There is no change to the guidance on attending funerals at present.

1.12 Can weddings go ahead?

There’s no change at this time, but we have set out our intention to enable small wedding ceremonies from 1 June. We understand the frustration couples planning a wedding must be feeling at this time. As with all the necessary coronavirus restrictions on register offices, places of worship and other venues, we will look to ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. We will work closely with faith leaders and local government over the coming weeks to go through the practicalities.

2. Vulnerable groups, shielding, 70 year olds and over, and care homes

2.1 Does easing restrictions apply to healthy 70 year olds and over?

The advice for those aged 70 and over continues to be that they should take particular care to minimise contact with others outside their household.

If they do go out more frequently, they should be careful to maintain distance from others. They and everyone should continue to comply with any general social distancing restrictions.

We know that those aged 70 and over can be absolutely fit and healthy and it’s not the case that everybody over 70 has a chronic health condition or an underlying disease.

But unfortunately, we also know that as you get older, there is a higher risk of coronavirus having a more serious impact with infection. Complications and deaths are more common in the elderly, even those without pre-existing conditions.

Anyone who has been advised to shield by the NHS or their GP, including those 70 and over, should continue to do this until at least the end of June.

2.2 How long will shielding be in place?

We’ve advised individuals with very specific medical conditions to shield until the end of June and to do everything they can to stay at home. This is because we believe they are likely to be at the greatest risk of serious complications from coronavirus.

We know this is challenging guidance to follow, which is why we have a support scheme in place to provide help with access to food and basic supplies, care, medicines and social support.

We are keeping the guidance to shielded people under review.

2.3 What safety standards will need to be put in place in care homes?

We have issued detailed guidance about infection control and staff safety in care homes to help admit and care for residents safely and protect care home staff.

This includes isolation procedures, PPE and infection control training for all staff, cleaning and how to provide personal care safely.

As with all of our advice, this guidance is kept under constant review and updated frequently, in line with the latest scientific evidence.

3. Going to work / Safer spaces

3.1 Who is allowed to go to work?

In the first instance, employers should make every effort to support working from home, including by providing suitable IT and equipment as they have been already. This will apply to many different types of businesses, particularly those who typically would have worked in offices or online.

Where work can only be done in the workplace, we have set out tailored guidelines for employers to help protect their workforce and customers from coronavirus while still continuing to trade or getting their business back up and running. We have published detailed COVID-19 secure guidelines, which has been developed in consultation with businesses and trades unions.

These ‘back to work’ guidelines apply to those in essential retail like:

  • supermarkets
  • those in construction and manufacturing
  • those working in labs and research facilities
  • those administering takeaways and deliveries at restaurants and cafes
  • tradesmen, cleaners and others who work in people’s homes
  • those who are facilitating trade or transport goods
  • and so on

Non-essential retail, restaurants, pubs, bars, gyms and leisure centres will remain closed. They will reopen in a phased manner provided it is safe to do so.

There are specific guidelines for those who are vulnerable, shielding, or showing symptoms.

3.2 What is a critical worker?

Critical workers are those working in health and care and other essential services, who can still take their children to school or childcare and can use hotels and other accommodation services for work related purposes – for example if they can’t get home after a shift or need to isolate from their families. This critical worker definition does not affect whether or not you can travel to work – if you are not a critical worker, you may still travel to work provided if you cannot reasonably work from home.

3.3 What is meant by the phased approach?

Not all forms of work will return to normal at once. People will have to prepare for a new type of normal. We need to make sure that any changes we do make are carefully monitored and that we aren’t doing anything to increase the risk of infection and push the Reproductive value (R0) above 1. R0 describes how many people on average will be infected for every one person who has COVID-19.

We will ensure that businesses have time to prepare their premises to operate as safely as possible.

We will set out more detail about the phasing in due course.

3.4 Will you open pubs / cinemas / hairdressers in July?

The roadmap sets out that some businesses (like pubs, cinemas or hairdressers) will not open until Step 3 is reached.

The government’s current planning assumption is that this step will be no earlier than 4 July and subject to further detailed scientific advice, provided closer to the time, on how far we can go. When they do reopen, they should also meet the COVID-19 secure guidelines.

3.5 What are the ‘Covid-Secure’ safety guidelines workplaces have to be put in place?

We have set out clear, practical steps that businesses should take to ensure their workplaces are COVID-19 secure and give their staff the confidence to return back to work.

These include how to keep as many people as possible safely apart from those they do not live with in various workplace settings.

3.6 Do people need to wear face coverings at work?

Face coverings are not compulsory. However, if you can, people are advised to wear face coverings in enclosed public spaces where social distancing is not possible or where you are more likely to come into contact with people you do not normally meet. For example, on public transport or in some shops. Face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

A face covering is not the same as the surgical masks or respirators used as part of personal protective equipment by healthcare and other workers; these should continue to be reserved for those who need them to protect against risks in their workplace such as health and care workers and those in industrial settings like those exposed to dust hazards.

3.7 Will a face covering stop me getting COVID-19?

The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

To protect yourself, you should continue to follow social distancing measures and isolation guidance and wash your hands regularly.

4. Workers’ rights

4.1 My employer is asking me to come to work but I’m scared.

Employers and staff should discuss and agree working arrangements.

Employers should make all efforts to help people to work from home where they can. But where work cannot be done at home, employers should take clear, practical steps to help protect workers and create safe places to work, such as shift working or staggering processes. To identify the precautions needed to manage risk, your employer should discuss the workplace risk assessment with you to identify the practical ways of managing those risks.

If you remain concerned that your employer is not taking all practical steps to promote social distancing then you can report this to your local authority or the Health and Safety Executive who can take a range of action, including where appropriate requiring your employer to take additional steps.

We have published further specific “COVID-19 Secure” guidelines on how to make workplaces safe, which have been developed in consultation with over 200 business leaders and trades union organisations.

4.2 What if they try to fire me because I won’t go to work but cannot work at home?

We urge employers to take socially responsible decisions and listen to the concerns of their staff. Employers and employees should come to a pragmatic agreement about their working arrangements.

If individuals need advice, they should approach ACAS where they can get impartial advice about work disputes.

5. Public Transport

5.1 Who is allowed to travel on public transport?

If you cannot work from home and have to travel to work, or if you must make an essential journey, you should cycle or walk wherever possible. Before you travel on public transport, consider if your journey is necessary and if you can, stay local. Try to reduce your travel. This will help keep the transport network running and allows people who need to make essential journeys to travel.

We’ll be setting out further guidance for passengers with more advice on how to stay safe during your journeys later this week.

5.2 Should people wear face coverings on public transport?

If you can, wear a face covering in an enclosed space where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet. This is most relevant for short periods indoors in crowded areas, for example on public transport or in some shops. The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

If people choose to wear them, we are asking people to make their own face coverings at home, using scarves or other textile items. We are publishing guidance to help illustrate the process.

We urge the public not to purchase medical or surgical masks as these should be reserved for health and social care workers.

5.3 Can I use public transport to get to green spaces?

You should avoid using public transport wherever possible.

6. Schools and Childcare

6.1 Can children go back to early years settings, schools or university?

We initially urge those who are currently eligible to use school provision (children of critical workers and vulnerable children) to attend. As soon as it is safe to do so we will bring more year groups back to school in a phased way when it is safe to have larger numbers of children within schools, but not before. Keeping children and staff safe is our utmost priority.

Schools should prepare to begin opening for more children from 1 June. The government expects children to be able to return to early years settings, and for Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 to be back in school in smaller class sizes from this point.

Secondary schools and further education colleges should also prepare to begin some face to face contact with Year 10 and 12 pupils who have key exams next year, in support of their continued remote, home learning.

The government’s ambition is for all primary school children to return to school before the summer for a month if feasible.

6.2 How will you make sure it is safe?

Schools can now operate if they are organised in a way that is compatible with minimising the spread of the virus. The next phase of measures will require the development of new safety standards to set out how physical spaces, including schools, can be adapted to operate safely.

We have published guidance advising schools on reopening to ensure schools can adequately prepare for the next phase. One of the main protective measures we can take to reduce transmission is to have small consistent group and class sizes.

6.3 Will children be compelled to wear face coverings at school?

No this will not be required. We have published further advice on protective measures in schools.

7. Borders / international visitors

Please note – these measures are NOT yet in force. We will set out further detail, including from when these will be in force, in due course.

7.1 Are you isolating people at the border now?

The scientific advice shows that when domestic transmission is high, cases from abroad represent a small amount of the overall total and make no significant difference to the epidemic. Now that domestic transmission within the UK is coming under control, and other countries begin to lift lockdown measures, it is the right time to prepare new measures at the border.

7.2 What is self-isolation and which countries will it apply to?

We will be asking people travelling to the UK to make some sacrifices to stop coronavirus cases from being imported. In the same way as people in the UK have made large sacrifices to control the spread of coronavirus.

So what we will be asking people to do on entering the UK is supply their contact details and details of their accommodation, and to self-isolate in their accommodation for 14 days, other than those on a short list of exemptions.

We will set out further details shortly.

7.3 Is this for foreign travellers only or British people returning home from holiday or living overseas?

All arrivals including British nationals will be required to provide their contact information and self-isolate upon arrival, other than those on a short list of exemptions.

8. Enforcement

8.1 How will police enforce the new rules?

The police and local authorities have the powers to enforce the requirements set out in law if people do not comply with them. The police will act with discretion and common sense in applying these measures, but if you breach the law, the police may instruct you to go home, leave an area or disperse, and they may instruct you to take steps to stop your children breaking these rules if they have already done so. The police can also take you home or arrest you where they believe it is necessary.

If the police believe that you have broken the law – or if you refuse to follow their instructions enforcing the law – a police officer may issue you with a fixed penalty notice of £100 (reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days), an increase of £40 from the previous £60 fixed penalty amount. If you have already received a fixed penalty notice, the amount for further offences will increase in line with the table below.

First offence£100
Second offence£200
Third offence£400
Fourth offence£800
Fifth offence£1600
Maximum penalty£3200

For both individuals and companies, if you do not pay your fine you could be taken to court, with magistrates able to impose unlimited fines.

Message from Devon and Cornwall Police

Devon and Cornwall police have received a number of calls in the last few months from members of the public reporting off road motorcycles riding along the public bridal ways on the Wheal Maid site and Poldice Valley.

We are working with our partner agencies (County Council, Parish Council and Environmental Agency) to resolve these issues by holding regular operations to educate and if necessary enforce.

Off road riding and driving causes real damage to the landscape, heritage sites (Wheal Maid is a World Heritage Site) and can cause alarm and distress to the public, dogs, horses and any other livestock in the location.

It is an offence under the Road Traffic Act to use a mechanically propelled vehicle without lawful authority on common land, moorland, on any footpath or bridleway. If you are riding off road on private land you must have the permission of the land owner to be there.

If you are caught riding/driving on such sites without permission you could receive a fine and have your vehicle seized.

Information on the law and regulations concerning off road riding can be found by visiting the Devon and Cornwall Police website: https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/on-the-road/off-road/ On this page there is also a list of suitable sites for off road driving/riding together with a link to report any issues with any off road riders/drivers.

Cornwall Council are also in the process of setting up a direct link to report off road bikes on foot paths and bridal ways, this link will hopefully be available on their homepage in the near future.

To report illegal riders call 101 or email 101@devonandcornwall.pnn.police.uk

St Day Newsletter Update

Firstly, a Happy Easter to all! I trust this notification finds you safe and well, under these sureal circumstances.

There will be no May newsletter, due to the current pandemic and the risk that it puts on those involved in producing and delivering.

I do apologise for this, but am hopeful that the August newsletter will indeed be out (fingers crossed).

Of course for those with paid accounts for this issue (and if necessary the next), it/they will carry over for an additional issue/s at a later date.

Please stay safe and stay at home,
Sarah